Archive for January, 2011

Jan 29th Interview with Sanj Altan of the SMHRIC

Monday, January 31st, 2011

Sanj Altan of the Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center updates the situation with the continued captivity of Hada and provides some observations about a brief telephone conversation with Hada’s uncle.

Keep the pressure on the Chinese government and urge your elected representatives to raise the issue of the continuing human rights violations being committed against Hada and his family with Chinese authorities at every available opportunity.

SMHRIC: Human Rights must be a priority topic on Hu Jintao’s visit

Friday, January 21st, 2011

Human Rights must be a priority topic on Hu Jintao’s visit
For immediate release
January 18, 2011
Contact: Southern Mongolian Human Rights Center (718) 786-9256

The Obama administration has chosen a careful but low-key posture on human rights in China. President Hu Jintao’s state visit this week is the right time for the United States to make clear its expectations – that China must live up to her own constitutional guarantees,  and accept international conventions to which she herself has been a signatory. China should do more than pay lip service to these formal commitments, and the US must make clear to President Hu that China must move towards a free and open society that respects the rule of law. We urge President Obama to speak frankly to President Hu about this important question, and to recognize the widespread international criticism of China’s human rights record, particularly regarding the treatment of the Mongols, the Tibetans and the Uyghurs.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) has documented the Chinese failure to meet key tenets of the National Human Rights Action Plan for 2009 and 2010. Chinese authorities continue to suppress the rights of Mongolians to maintain their own culture, live according to their nomadic traditions and educate in their own language. Chinese economic interests further industrialize the grasslands of Southern Mongolia, eliminating nomadic communities, upsetting the balance of nature and disregarding the rights of the indigenous people. The well known dissident Hada completed his 15 year sentence in December only to be placed under arrest, along with his entire family. More than a month later, nothing is known about their whereabouts, despite their serious medical conditions. Other family members have been harassed, and dissidents remain under house arrest.  The case of Hada and others show the extent to which arbitrary detention, torture and judicial malfeasance are malignancies in Chinese society. There is no freedom of speech or expression for the Mongols of China, and each passing year brings additional restrictions on their right to live according to their cultural traditions.

The Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. believed that an injustice anywhere against anyone is an injustice against everyone everywhere. We urge President Obama to remind President Hu of this basic truth, and to urge China to commit to allow a fair and open hearing of the legitimate grievances of minority peoples. This is consistent with American values, and such an act of leadership by President Obama will sow the seeds of future democratic values in the largest nation of the world, a country whose sole interest at present seems to be economic growth at any cost.

Southern Mongolian Human Rights Center (www.SMHRIC.org)
Tel: (718) 786- 9256
Fax: (718) 786- 9256
info@SMHRIC.org

Demonstrations Held Worldwide for the Release of Hada and Others

Monday, January 17th, 2011

On January 8, 2011, at 12:00 PM, local time, demonstrations were held by the Southern Mongolian exiles and their supporters in front of the Chinese Embassies in Mongolia, Japan, United States, Sweden, France, Netherlands, and Germany to urge the Chinese Government to release the prominent Southern Mongolian political prisoner Mr. Hada, his wife Ms. Xinna and son Uiles, dissident writer Ms. Huuchinhuu, young activist Mr. Arslan, and other dissidents who are under the authorities’ tight control for peacefully expressing their political opinions and defending their legal rights.

The demonstrators held high the banners and signs of "Release Hada Now", "Release Xinna and Uiles", "Release Hada Family", "Release Huuchinhuu", "Release Arslan" and shouted loudly the slogans of "Free Southern Mongolia", "China Out of
Mongolia", "End Chinese Colonization", "We Want Freedom", "We Want Independence", "We Want Self-determination", "We Want Human Rights", "We Want Human Dignity", "Mongolia For Mongolians Only", "Shame on China", and "Shame on the Chinese Government".

Representatives of the demonstrations also submitted letters to the Chinese Embassies to urge the Chinese Government to stop violating the Mongolian people’s basic human rights and fundamental freedom that are guaranteed by the international human rights conventions.


Demonstration in Germany

Demonstration in Germany

 


Demonstration in Mongolia

 


Demonstration in Mongolia

 


Demonstration in Japan

 


Demonstration in Japan

 


Demonstration in Sweden

 


Demonstration in Sweden

 


Demonstration in Netherlands

 

Demonstration in Netherlands

 


Demonstration in France

 


Demonstration in France

 


Demonstration in Washington DC

 


Demonstration in Washington DC

 


Demonstration in New York

 


Demonstration in New York

 


Demonstration in New York

 

Demonstration in New York

 

Jan 2011 Interview with Enghebatu Togochog of the Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center

Sunday, January 16th, 2011

Jan 2011 Interview with Enghebatu Togochog of the Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center. He discusses what can be done to help Hada, his family and others.

Urgent Appeal to Fax/Email/Write the White House Regarding the Detention of Hada

Sunday, January 16th, 2011

Below is a sample letter suggested by the Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center to send to your elected representatives in Washington D.C.

January xx, 2011
The White House (by Fax 202-456-2461)
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Dear President Obama,

My name is Your Name, a resident of Your Town,State. The purpose of my letter is to bring to your attention my concerns about an extreme human rights violation in China as heinous as the imprisonment of the Nobel Prize winner Liu Xiaobo. It is the story of a prominent ethnic Mongolian dissident who spent 15 years in a Chinese prison on baseless charges of “separatism” and “espionage” and then was immediately taken into detention on his scheduled release day. Equally disturbing is that his wife and son were taken into police custody the week prior to his release date. Since December 18, 2010 there has been a virtual black out of information about their whereabouts or conditions because the authorities have imposed a curtain of silence around their friends and relatives. This is particularly concerning since both Mr. Hada and his wife are ill.

Mr. Hada, an ethnic Mongol scholar, founded the Southern Mongolian Democratic Alliance (SMDA) to promote Mongolian culture and ethnic identity among the Mongols in China, and to advocate Southern Mongolian democracy and human rights. Although the activities of the SMDA were completely in keeping with the laws of China, Mr. Hada was  accused of trumped up charges related to ‘splittism’ and sentenced to an exceptionally long jail term. He suffered unbearably inhumane treatment in prison. Following Mr. Hada’s imprisonment, his family-run book shop was forcibly closed several times by Chinese authorities and his wife and son were frequently harassed and interrogated. His son had to drop out from high school to struggle for a living. The family was supposed to have been reunited after this long traumatic separation on December 10, 2010 however as of today, more than a month following his scheduled release, there is no news regarding the whereabouts of the family. Details regarding events over the past month are available on the website of the Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center (www.smhric.org) as well as articles in the electronic New York Times (www.nytimes.com/2010/12/14/world/asia/14china.html) and the Amnesty International website (www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/ASA17/001/2011/en).

Mr. President, I know you share my concerns about human rights and if you knew the details of this case, you would be as concerned about Mr. Hada, his wife Xinna and son Uiles as I am and therefore I would like to ask that you help find effective channels of communication to the government of China to free Mr. Hada and his family. I urge you to intercede on their behalf and ask President Hu Jintao directly on his upcoming visit to Washington for information about Mr. Hada and his family and to release them on humanitarian grounds. For this, I would be very grateful as would so many other persecuted people within the borders of China who have no voice to speak freely on their own behalf.

Sincerely yours,