Archive for December, 2014

Hada’s and Xinna’s Statement Video Statements

Monday, December 15th, 2014

Video statements by Hada and Xinna (with English subtitles and texts)
http://smhric.org/news_551.htm
The following are video statements by Mr.Hada and his wife Xinna sent to the Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center (SMHRIC) recently. (English translation and subtitles by SMHRIC):

First Statement by Hada (December 10, 2014 in Mongolian):

Today, 19 years later, the trumped-up case against me has ended. During these 19 years, in an effort to force me to abandon my beliefs, I was cruelly mistreated and subjected to various forms of tortures and ploys. Yet, I have maintained my beliefs and continued my struggle to today to come to the first step of victory. However, the sacrifices and losses are immeasurable. In particular, my wife and son have been subjected to false accusations, enormous persecution and suffering. I myself have been disabled as a result of torture and brutality. Before the discharge, even though [the Chinese authorities] mentioned to me multiple times that I can file complaints and pursue lawsuits, they have made a great deal of efforts to torture me further in order to deprive me of my rights to seek redress. Particularly, they made repeated efforts to threaten me that I must not receive interviews from foreign news media; I must not contact anyone other than my relatives. What is most unacceptable is that they claimed the right to continue to treat me as a prisoner after the discharge. I unequivocally rejected all these conditions. My next step is to arrange my life and study, to continue to fight against the oppression of the Mongolian nationality, and start my complaints and lawsuit. I would like to express my deep gratitude to my fellow Mongolians around the world who have been concerned about our family.

First Statement by Hada (December 10, 2014 in Chinese):

Today, 19 years later, the trumped-up case against me has ended. During these 19 years, in an effort to force me to abandon my beliefs, I was cruelly mistreated and subjected to various forms of tortures and ploys. Yet, I have maintained my beliefs and continued my struggle to today to come to the first step of victory. However, the sacrifices and losses are immeasurable. In particular, my wife and son have been subjected to false accusations, enormous persecution and suffering. I myself have been disabled as a result of torture and brutality. Before the discharge, even though [the Chinese authorities] mentioned to me multiple times that I can file complaints and pursue lawsuits, they have made a great deal of efforts to torture me further in order to deprive me of my rights to seek redress. Particularly, they made repeated efforts to threaten me that I must not receive interviews from foreign news media; I must not contact anyone other than my relatives. What is most unacceptable is that they claimed the right to continue to treat me as a prisoner after the discharge. I unequivocally rejected all these conditions. My next step is to arrange my life and study, to continue to fight against the oppression of the Mongolian nationality, and start my complaints and lawsuit. I would like to express my deep gratitude to my fellow Mongolians around the world who have been concerned about our family.

Joint statement by Hada and Xinna (December 10, 2014):

Hada: Today, 19 years later, the trumped-up case against me has ended. During these 19 years, in an effort to force me to abandon my beliefs, I was cruelly mistreated and subjected to various forms of tortures and ploys. Yet, I have maintained my beliefs and continued my struggle to today to come to the first step of victory. However, the sacrifices and losses are immeasurable. In particular, my wife and son have been subjected to false accusations, enormous persecution and suffering. I myself have been disabled as a result of torture and brutality. Before the discharge, even though [the Chinese authorities] mentioned to me multiple times that I can file complaints and pursue lawsuits, they have made a great deal of efforts to torture me further in order to deprive me of my rights to seek redress. Particularly, they made repeated efforts to threaten me that I must not receive interviews from foreign news media; I must not contact anyone other than my relatives. What is most unacceptable is that they claimed the right to continue to treat me as a prisoner after the discharge. I unequivocally rejected all these conditions. My next step is to arrange my life and study, to continue to fight against the oppression of the Mongolian nationality, and start my complaints and lawsuit. I would like to express my deep gratitude to my fellow Mongolians around the world who have been concerned about our family.

Xinna: Today is December 10, 2014. It is the International Human Rights Day. It is also the second day of Hada’s release. Taking this opportunity, I would like to say a few words to our fellow Mongolians around the world:

1. Hada who was imprisoned for 19 years had the luck not to die in prison. Yesterday, he was finally released. It would not have been a surprise had Hada died in prison given the darkness of the Chinese Political and Legal Affairs Committee during the Zhou Yongkang era. So, the question is, are the authorities afraid of Hada as an individual. The answer is NO. In fact, they are not afraid of Hada himself. But they are afraid of international public opinion demanding justice and the overwhelming number of our fellow Mongolians who have been concerned about our family. Thanks to the long efforts by our Mongolian brothers and sisters who tirelessly appealed for the wellbeing of Hada and our family to the international community, standing in freezing winter and hot summer to cry out for our freedom and drawing the attention of the international community. Therefore, here I would like to thank all of my fellow Mongolian brothers and sisters for their tireless support of our family.

2. Although Hada has been suffering from extreme physical and mental trauma as a result of the 19 years of imprisonment, he has never given up. What is even more admirable is that he speaks loudly and fearlessly to the news media. Being imprisoned is frightening. Surrendering out of fear of imprisonment is even more frightening.

3. In fact, the tragedy Hada and our family have gone through is the tip of the iceberg of the Mongolian question as a whole. Since the start of China’s Reform and Open-up policy thirty years ago, the national minorities in China have been facing new challenges. In this new era in history, how to effectively defend the rights of our Mongolians and how to continue our resistance has been a new question. The path to national revival is on a long path of exploration. Hada’s release marks a new chapter in Mongolian history. I urge the younger generations to learn a lesson from this experience. I hope more and more young Mongolians will embark on their journey of aspiration and realize their dreams through rational and effective means.

Xinna’s statement (December 9, 2014):

Today is December 9, 2014. After 19 years of imprisonment, Hada is finally released today. The three members of our family are finally able to join together. Hada spoke just now also. He is in much better spirits today. It can be said to be fortunate that he had not died during the 19 years of ordeal in prison. What is left to us is slow recovery. Here I would like to make the following three points:

1. Hada was handed down a harsh sentence of 15 years in jail because of national problems. However, after his completion of the full prison term on December 10, 2010, he was not released, instead he was placed under extrajudicial detention for four years. I won’t go into further details of the previous 15 years unjust imprisonment for now. As far as the past four years of extrajudicial detention is concerned, our family intends to file a lawsuit to fight to the end for a just resolution.

2. Because we, mother and son, consistently appealed for Hada’s freedom, the authorities have also persecuted us as criminals. I was sentenced to 3 years in jail with 5 years reprieve on a charge of “engaging in illegal business”. My son Uiles was also subjected to a trumped-up accusation of “illegal drug possession”. Therefore, we, mother and son, will also file lawsuits in accordance with the law.

3. If China is indeed a country of the rule of law, the unjust treatment of our family must be redressed. The parties involved in the persecution of our family must be brought to justice. Finally, I hope the tragedy of our family will never be repeated in any part of China. (December 9, 2014, China).

Hada, discharged from “black jail”, but not free

Thursday, December 11th, 2014

Hada, discharged from “black jail”, but not free
http://smhric.org/news_550.htm
SMHRIC
December 10, 2014
New York

hada_interview
Mr. Hada, discharged from the “black jail”, but not free (SMHRIC photo)

On December 9, 2014, the eve of the International Human Rights Day, long-imprisoned Southern (Inner) Mongolian political prisoner Mr. Hada, 59 years old, was allowed to meet with his wife Xinna, son Uiles, brother Yushan and sister Yuyue in an apartment reportedly owned by the Inner Mongolian Public Security Bureau.

Hada was transferred to this residential-like yet heavily guarded apartment on November 17, 2014 from the “black jail” in suburban Hohhot where he was placed under extrajudicial detention for four years after completing his 15 year jail term on December 10, 2010.

After many failed attempts, the Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center (SMHRIC) was able to have a brief Skype video interview with Hada last night. The interview lasted only 15 seconds before the communication line was cut apparently by the Chinese authorities. All subsequent phone calls to Xinna, Uiles, Yushan and Yuyue and Skype video calls have been blocked.

During the brief video conversation, Hada told SMHRIC that he was allowed to have a medical examination and was diagnosed with more than 10 different health problems which as he stated were all caused by the inhumane treatment and conditions of the 19-year imprisonment. He also told SMHRIC that he is currently confined to the fifth floor apartment in a residential complex that has been heavily guarded around the clock by security personnel.

In sporadic written communications, Xinna stated that Hada and family members have never admitted to any “wrongdoing” or “crime” and are determined to file legal cases against those who were responsible for the unjust trial, illegal imprisonment and extrajudicial detention of Hada and his family members. Xinna also revealed that after some phone interviews with overseas news media, Hada’s brother Yushan and sister Yuyue were warned not to accept any requests for phone interviews.

In the latest text message SMHRIC received around 11:00 PM Eastern Standard Time today, Xinna confirmed that cable internet and wireless network connections have been completely cut in Hada’s residence and surrounding areas. The same State Security personnel who guarded Hada in the “black jail” are reportedly following Xinna and Uiles.

“On the International Human Rights Day today, we are still having difficulty defending our right to communication and right to receive interviews,” Xinna said in the last statement.

Southern Mongolian exiles and their supporters still staged protests in front of Chinese embassies and consulates in their respective countries today to urge the Chinese Government to free Hada and his family members. Southern Mongolian communities around the world still do not believe that Hada is truly “freed”. Rather they consider this as another form of house arrest or the so-called “residential surveillance” under which Hada has no freedom of movement or assembly, no freedom of communication and no freedom of speech and expression. Although brief and sporadic meetings with family members and relatives are allowed under tight surveillance, no true family reunion has yet taken place in their own home.

China releases one of its longest-serving political prisoners, relative says

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

China releases one of its longest-serving political prisoners, relative says

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/12/09/us-china-rights-idUSKBN0JN0VG20141209

(Reuters) – China has freed one of its longest-serving political prisoners, the ethnic Mongol dissident Hada, who has spent much of the last two decades behind bars, his uncle said on Tuesday.

Beijing fears ethnic unrest in strategic border areas and keeps a tight rein on Inner Mongolia, just as it does on Tibet and Xinjiang in the far west, even though the region is supposed to have a large measure of autonomy.

“He’s not in good health,” the dissident’s uncle, Haschuluu, told Reuters, adding that Hada’s younger brother had told him of the release, which took place on Tuesday morning in the Inner Mongolian capital of Hohhot. He declined to comment further.

Many Mongols in China go by just one name.

Hada was tried behind closed doors in 1996 and jailed for 15 years for separatism, spying and supporting the Southern Mongolian Democratic Alliance, which sought greater rights for China’s ethnic Mongols. He says the charges were trumped up.

After being released in December 2010, he had to serve a separate sentence of four years of “deprivation of political rights”, mostly in an illegal detention center in the northern region of Inner Mongolia, his family says.

Hada’s wife Xinna, who lives in Hohhot, and their son, Uiles, have also been in and out of detention over the past few years. Reuters was unable to reach either of them by telephone.

Calls to the Inner Mongolia government to seek comment went unanswered.

Amnesty International considered Hada a prisoner of conscience and has expressed fears about his well-being, as have the United States and European Union.

While Hada’s release was a positive sign, he was likely to remain closely watched, as commonly happens with dissidents, said Patrick Poon, a China researcher at Amnesty International in Hong Kong.

“Although he will have more freedom of movement now he’s been released, the whole family might be subject to a certain amount of surveillance,” Poon said.

Xinna has complained about her husband’s poor treatment, and said authorities pressured him this year to divorce her in exchange for an early release.

Decades of migration by the dominant Han have left Chinese Mongols a minority in their own land. Officially, they make up less than a fifth of Inner Mongolia’s population of almost 24 million.

In 2011, the Mongol community held demonstrations demanding better protection of its rights and traditions, spurred by the death of a Mongol herder who had been protesting against pollution from a coal mine.